Author: http://galina-ulanova.tumblr.com/

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Vaganova Ballet Academy graduate (class of 2019), Ivan Poddubnyak as the Golden Idol. “La Bayadere” at the Bolshoi. Photos by Batya Annadurdyev.

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Parallels. Pina Bausch, “The Right of Spring” // a detail of a Bernini sculpture.

Tumblr @staff keep blocking these images, and I’ll keep posting them ūüĖēūü§ď

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Congratulations are in order.

Our congratulations to Angelina Vorontsova, who has added another award to her collection. She became a laureate of the Youth Prize conferred by the Government of St. Petersburg in the field of arts. ‚ÄúAngelina has unique natural abilities. A good professional school and physical training allow her to perform leading roles in the ballets of classical and modern repertoire and cope easily with any technical difficulties,‚ÄĚ Zhanna Ayupova, the young ballerina‚Äôs coach, commented.“ – Mikhailovsky Theatre

faerunner:

time-lordd:

saiktaru:

vagin0:

disneyprincessoflyrian:

books-and-cookies:

alexbelvocal:

ultravioletnights:

i’m sorry but there is no way you could have stopped me from standing on my chair and screeching like a banshee if i saw this live…

What

how

HOW

‚Äúballet isn‚Äôt a sport‚ÄĚ

The thing about this is, you can barely see their muscles straining from effort. The effort to keep each other and themselves balanced, definitely, but that guy’s hand is barely shaking. The amount of training and strength and balance to go into this is fucking insane.

Ballet is raw AF

I’ve seen this before, and this isn’t even Western ballet. This is Chinese (as in, from China) ballet. And they are AMAZING! This doesn’t even scratch the surface of what this ballet company can do.

They took Western ballet and said, ‚ÄúHey, let‚Äôs take this to the next level!‚ÄĚ

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Vaganova Ballet Academy graduate, Maria Bulanova (class of Professor Lyudmila Kovaleva, 2018), has been promoted to Second Soloist at the Mariinsky.

Thank you to everyone who messaged me about this. ‚̧ԳŹ¬†

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Ekaterina Geltser and Vasily Tikhomirov. 1913.

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November the 14th marked the 143rd anniversary since the birth of Ekaterina Geltser (14 November 1876 – 12 December 1962).

Ekaterina Geltzer. Russian-Soviet dancer who is generally regarded as the first ‚ÄėSoviet‚Äô ballerina. She was the daughter of Vasily Geltser, mime artist and ballet master at the Bolshoi Ballet (who also co-wrote the original libretto for Swan Lake) and studied at the Bolshoi School from 1884, graduating into the company in 1894.She took further studies with Christian Johansson and Petipa in St Petersburg. In 1896 she went to St Petersburg to dance with the Mariinsky for two years, then returned to the Bolshoi where she was promoted to first ballerina in 1901.

A stocky dancer with a robust, even heroic style, Geltser was the definitive Bolshoi ballerina in the early part of the 20th century, her forceful stage personality showcased especially in the dramatic roles of Gorsky.

She created the role of Swanilda in Gorsky‚Äôs new staging of Copp√©lia (1905), Colombine in his Harlequinade (1907), the title role in his Salammb√ī (1910), Medora in his 1912 staging of Le Corsaire, and Tsar-Maiden in his Little Humpbacked Horse (1914). She also danced the traditional ballerina repertory, excelling most in the demi-caract√®re roles of Kitri and Esmeralda. She appeared with Diaghilev‚Äôs Ballets Russes in Paris in 1910; the following year at the Alhambra Theatre in London with dancers from the Bolshoi. She also appeared at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York with Mordkin‚Äôs All-Star Imperial Russian Ballet, dancing Odette-Odile in the first complete Swan Lake ever seen in America (1911).

One of her most significant creations was the role of Tao-Hoa in the groundbreaking Soviet ballet The Red Poppy (1927), choreographed by her husband and stage partner Vassily Tikhomirov. She retired from the Bolshoi in 1935, although continued to tour extensively in Russia.

She was one of the first ballerinas to be awarded the title of People’s Artist of the USSR (1925). РOxford  Reference

Source of photos: Bolshoi Ballet Academy archives.

tsiskaridze:

November the 14th marked the 143rd anniversary since the birth of Ekaterina Geltser (14 November 1876 –¬†12 December 1962).

Ekaterina Geltzer.¬†Russian-Soviet dancer who is generally regarded as the first ‚ÄėSoviet‚Äô ballerina. She was the daughter of Vasily Geltser, mime artist and ballet master at the Bolshoi Ballet (who also co-wrote the original libretto for Swan Lake) and studied at the Bolshoi School from 1884, graduating into the company in 1894.She took further studies with Christian Johansson and Petipa in St Petersburg. In 1896 she went to St Petersburg to dance with the Mariinsky for two years, then returned to the Bolshoi where she was promoted to first ballerina in 1901.¬†

A stocky dancer with a robust, even heroic style, Geltser was the definitive Bolshoi ballerina in the early part of the 20th century, her forceful stage personality showcased especially in the dramatic roles of Gorsky. 

She created the role of Swanilda in Gorsky‚Äôs new staging of Copp√©lia (1905), Colombine in his Harlequinade (1907), the title role in his Salammb√ī (1910), Medora in his 1912 staging of Le Corsaire, and Tsar-Maiden in his Little Humpbacked Horse (1914). She also danced the traditional ballerina repertory, excelling most in the demi-caract√®re roles of Kitri and Esmeralda. She appeared with Diaghilev‚Äôs Ballets Russes in Paris in 1910; the following year at the Alhambra Theatre in London with dancers from the Bolshoi. She also appeared at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York with Mordkin‚Äôs All-Star Imperial Russian Ballet, dancing Odette-Odile in the first complete Swan Lake ever seen in America (1911).¬†

One of her most significant creations was the role of Tao-Hoa in the groundbreaking Soviet ballet The Red Poppy (1927), choreographed by her husband and stage partner Vassily Tikhomirov. She retired from the Bolshoi in 1935, although continued to tour extensively in Russia. 

She was one of the first ballerinas to be awarded the title of People’s Artist of the USSR (1925). РOxford  Reference

Source of photos: Bolshoi Ballet Academy archives.

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From Kirill Sokolovsky’s interview with La Personne. 

Kirill, how did you get into ballet?

I took dance and step classes together with my next-door neighbour – a girl. When I was in fourth grade, some people from the Belarusian State Choreography Gymnasium-College came to our school; they were looking for potential new students. When they asked:¬†‚ÄúDoes anyone do dance?‚ÄĚ, I raised my hand, naturally. They asked me to step forward, looked me over, and asked for my mom‚Äôs phone number. They called her almost immediately. I worked out that the trip from my house to the college would take an hour and a half one way, and together with my parents we decided that the commute would be too long. We turned the offer¬†down. The college wouldn‚Äôt stop calling, though.¬†They called every day, even after the enrolments had finished. I ended up coming to the second round of auditions later that summer. I was very vocal about not wanting to dance in tights, but my mom bribed me with the promise of a present. In the end, I got in.

What happened next?

I got on with my training in Belarus, but as time went on I learned more and more about Vaganova Ballet Academy. Overtime, I developed a strong desire to train there. One day, Vladimir Vasiliev came [to Minsk] to stage¬†‚ÄúAnyuta‚ÄĚ – one of his ballets;¬†I danced the part of Anyuta‚Äôs brother. During one of the rehearsals, Vladimir Viktorovich suggested that I should try to transfer [to VBA]. I gave it a go and, when I was in third year, I moved to St Petersburg. My parents had no idea about any of this until my transfer was finalised.

Translated by melmoth
Photos by Alisa Aslanova
Interview ny Elizaveta Emelkina

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Vaganova Ballet Academy classical dance and duet methodology professor Irina Trifonova celebrates her jubilee today (October 29, 2019). Trifonova is the Academy’s longest-serving teacher Рshe has been working there since 1951! Trifonova had studied under Maria Romanova (Galina Ulanova’s mother) and Agrippina Vaganova. Happy birthday!

The photos are from the Vaganova Ballet Academy’s archive.